Journal news for 20-27 January

A brief summary of recent news related to journals and scientific publishing.

Datasets International

The open access publisher Hindawi has launced Datasets International, which “aims at helping researchers in all academic disciplines archive, document, and distribute the datasets produced in their research to the entire academic community.” For a processing charge of $300 authors can upload an apparently unlimited amount of data under a Creative Commons CC0 licence (and associated dataset papers under an Attribution licence), according to comments on Scott Edmunds’ Gigablog. The new journals currently associated with this initiative are Dataset Papers in: Cell Biology, Optics, Atmospheric Sciences and Materials Science, though no doubt more will follow. (Heard via @ScottEdmunds.)

Peerage of Science

A company run by three Finnish scientists this week has a new take on improving peer review. Peerage of Science is a community of scientists (‘Peers’), formed initially by invitation, who review each other’s papers anonymously before submission to journals. Reviews are themselves subjected to review, which means that reviewers receive recognition and ratings for their work. The reviews can even be published in a special journal, Proceedings of the Peerage of Science. Journals can offer to publish manuscripts at any point, for a fee – this is how the company aims to make a profit. (Heard via chemistryworldblog, via @adametkin.)

Peer review by curated social media

Science writer Carl Zimmer (@carlzimmer) reported last week in the New York Times on a recent (open access) study in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA about the generation of multicellular yeast by artificial selection in the lab. He has now posted a follow-up article in his Discovery blog, in which he presents the conversation that followed on Twitter about this paper (using Storify) and invites the author to respond, which the author does. The comments on the latter post continue the conversation, and the author continues to respond. It’s an interesting example of the author of a controversial paper engaging constructively in post-publication peer review. (Heard via @DavidDobbs.)

Research Objects

Tom Scott (@derivadow, who works for Nature Publishing Group) has published a detailed blog post outlining a proposal for a new kind of scientific publication: the Research Object. This would be a collection of material, linked by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), including an article, raw data, protocols, links to news about the research published elsewhere, links to the authors and their institutions, and more. He credits the Force11 (‘Future of Research Communications and e-Scholarship’) community for the idea, which is developed in greater detail here (pdf). These elements may or may not be open access, although the sophisticated searches Scott envisages will be difficult if they are not. (Heard via @SpringerPlus.)

Analysis of F1000 Journal Rankings

Phil Davis of The Scholarly Kitchen has done an analysis of the journal ranking system announced by Faculty of 1000 (F1000) in October. The analysis includes nearly 800 journals that were given a provisional F1000 Journal Factor (called FFj by F1000) for 2010. Plotting the FFj of each journal against the number of articles from it that were evaluated by F1000 shows that the two numbers are closely related; in fact, the number of articles evaluated explains over 91% of the variation in FFj. Journals from which only a few articles were evaluated suffer not only from this bias, but also from a bias against interdisciplinary and physical science journals that publish little biology. It seems to me that these biases could easily be addressed by taking into account (a) the number of articles evaluated from each journal and (b) the proportion of biology articles published in it when calculating the FFj. F1000 would be wise to study this useful analysis when reviewing their ranking system, as they plan to do regularly, according to the original announcement. (Heard via @ScholarlyKitchn.)

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About Anna Sharman
A biomedical editor and scientific publishing consultant for researchers and journals.

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